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CONTINUING SCIENTIFIC EDUCATION IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

Monday, 21 November 2022

Canine and feline P-glycoprotein deficiency

  • The so-called "ivermectin sensitivity" was determined to be a P-glycoprotein deficiency caused by a genetic variant of the MDR1
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image assetIn 2001 the molecular genetic basis of so-called "ivermectin sensitivity" in herding breed dogs was determined to be a P-glycoprotein deficiency caused by a genetic variant of the MDR1 (ABCB1) gene often called "the MDR1 mutation." We have learned a great deal about P-glycoprotein's role in drug disposition since that discovery, namely that P-glycoprotein transports many more drugs than just macrocyclic lactones that P-glycoprotein mediated drug transport is present in more places than just the blood brain barrier, that some cats have a genetic variant of MDR1 that results in P-glycoprotein deficiency, that P-glycoprotein dysfunction can occur as a result of drug-drug interactions in any dog or cat, and that the concept of P-glycoprotein "inhibitors" versus P-glycoprotein substrates is somewhat arbitrary and artificial.

This paper will review these discoveries and discuss how they impact drug selection and dosing in dogs and cats with genetically mediated P-glycoprotein deficiency or P-glycoprotein dysfunction resulting from drug-drug interactions.

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Written by
Antonio Maria Tardo Med Vet PhD Student

Read 44 times Last modified on Saturday, 19 November 2022 13:26

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